Serological and Immunohistochemical Prevalence of Human Cytomegalovirus Co-infection among Hepatitis C Virus Patients Admitted to Kafer El Shiekh Liver and Heart Institute, Egypt

Main Article Content

Hany M. Ibrahim
Faten R. Abdel Ghaffar
Rabie E. El Shaer
Mohamed A. Madian

Abstract

Background: Human cytomegaloviruses (CMV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are badly affecting the liver and can lead to hepatitis. Co-infection of CMV and HCV could accelerate the disease pathogenesis and dramatically diminish its treatment.

Aim: The current study is aimed to determine the prevalence of CMV diagnosed serologically and immunohistochemically among the HCV patients and to assess the biochemical and haematological alterations in such co-infection.

Results: Overall prevalence of CMV infection was 47.83%, and 4.00%, using ELISA, and immunohistochemistry. No significant difference was detected in the prevalence of CMV among HCV patients based on gender, residence, age and HCV RNA load. Liver cirrhosis at patient with concomitant CMV IgG and chronic HCV infections showed a high percentage compared to those patients with chronic HCV mono-infection. Moreover, a significant reduction in the level of RBCs count, PCV, and Hb concentration was detected in patients with concomitant CMV and chronic HCV infections compared to patients with chronic HCV mono-infection.

Conclusion: CMV infection is frequent among HCV patients in Egypt. Obtained data recommend that screening and treating for CMV is of great importance among HCV patients in order to lessen the clinical outcome of chronic HCV infection.

Keywords:
Cytomegalovirus, Hepatitis C, co-infection, ELISA, IHC, Egypt

Article Details

How to Cite
Ibrahim, H. M., Ghaffar, F. R. A., Shaer, R. E. E., & Madian, M. A. (2018). Serological and Immunohistochemical Prevalence of Human Cytomegalovirus Co-infection among Hepatitis C Virus Patients Admitted to Kafer El Shiekh Liver and Heart Institute, Egypt. Asian Journal of Medicine and Health, 13(2), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.9734/AJMAH/2018/45313
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Original Research Article